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Windows 11 & NP900

(Topic created on: 12-10-2021 11:25 PM)
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Alex-1
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Hi everyone,

quick question. Have a laptop (NP900X3F) and would like to update to - not to force to! - Windows 11.

The CPU - i5-3337U - is not supported, but I could live with it. The biggest problem is that there seems to be no TPM module at all.

Would it be possible to add it, maybe in a dedicated but empty slot on the motherboard? (I know for a fact that some laptops of the 900-series came equipped with a TPM). If possible, which module should I buy? (type, brand) 

Thanks!

 

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antikythera
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You cannot plug a TPM into a laptop board it would be a soldered in chip, you would be better off sticking with W10 until 2025 and assuming the laptop is still in working order still by then switch to Kubuntu for example to extend the life of the laptop while having a secure and maintained operating system still beyond that W10 end of life date.
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Alex-1
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Oki, thx for your reply. I'll stick to W10...

About the module being soldered... possibly. Probably. But not necessarily. The RAM for example is indeed soldered (that's why I'm stuck with 4 GB). But the SSD is not (which I could replace, if it made sense. Which it doesn't, really...)...

Anyway... Thx again. 

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antikythera
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the TPM chip itself is tiny, while you can get plugin modules for desktop boards a laptop board would not have the same space available for a slot and nor would the chassis for the module. Whether it's worth replacing the SSD or not depends what you want from the laptop longer term. If you are happy with the amount and speed of the storage then yes leave well alone. I upgraded my old Sandybridge laptop from WD Blue mechanical storage to an MX500 SSD. It made a heck of a difference to both speed and battery life. That laptop is now a paperweight though as it's power circuit blew. It would have cost more to repair than economically viable so I got a new laptop instead (Legion 7 from Lenovo which is an absolute beast and came fitted with a Samsung 981 nvme)
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antikythera
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Given the 4GB ram limit that would push me towards Linux even sooner. Linux is far more efficient than Windows for RAM usage. Try out Kubuntu 21.04 which you can boot from USB or DVD and use without actually making any permanent change to your machine. I think you will like it as you are keen on Windows. I have Kubuntu on one desktop and it loads within 600MB RAM when freshly booted. So you'd have at least 3GB left for applications before it needed to use a pagefile.
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Alex-1
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An SSD and a spinning drive play in two different leagues. Luckily mine is already an SSD. Not particularly fast. Not particularly big (128 GB)... But, as said, in my case, replacing it with a faster / bigger one is not worth the money or the hassle, given the age of my laptop (think I got it in 2013...)... It's just a shame for the screen... Again, nothing special, but still 1920x1080... Anyway, I'll live with it... 

Alex-1
Journeyman
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I played with Linux in the past. I know it got better. But I'm getting old... And I just prefer windows. It works pretty well for me, never experienced those horror stories you constantly read about... I know how to fix the occasional little quirk... After all, I'll get updates up to 2025...

Anyway, thx again for your time and your advice... 

antikythera
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You're welcome. FYI I have avoided the horror stories too for the most part. Only the constant SSD TRIM bug happened but that was easily sorted by turning off scheduled optimisation.
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Alex-1
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see, that's my secret trick with Windows: I just let it run. Specifically, I wasn't aware of the TRIM bug. Have just read now it has been addressed with a subsequent update. And that it was triggered by a reboot. Since my PC is basically always on... nothing really happened.

My only issue in the past with Windows was with an embedded graphic card. But truth to be told, it wasn't really Windows fault. Rather of the manufacturer that never updated the driver, forcing me to install Win7 driver all the way through Win8, Win8.1, and 10... after I don't remember which release of Win10 the trick stopped working its magic... 

Anyway...

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halenandrsons
First Poster
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@Alex-1 wrote:

Hi everyone,

quick question. Have a laptop (NP900X3F) and would like to update to - not to force to! - Windows 11.

The CPU - i5-3337U - is not supported, but I could live with it. The biggest problem is that there seems to be no TPM module at all.

Would it be possible to add it, maybe in a dedicated but empty slot on the motherboard? (I know for a fact that some laptops of the 900-series came equipped with a TPM). If possible, which module should I buy? (type, brand) 

Thanks!

 


Although Antikythera recommend things to do. But there are also some methods available to bypass TPM module and after you did it windows working fine. There is one thing all i saw is just running windows in systems to bypass tpm but they are not telling its cons as every action has a reaction so there might be one too.

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