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HT-J4500 home cinema, cycling on and off repeatedly.

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Explorer

Although I've had it a good few years, never having a problem with it, my home cinema system is throwing a fit. It seemed to start when the blu ray/ dvd drawer wouldn't fully extend. I gently pulled it and inserted the disc and it seemed to work okay. The next day, when I switched it on, it now cycles through "LOAD", "No DISC" repeatedly, even when trying to use "D in", "AUX" or any other setting. I've disconected the drive from the rest of the unit, no difference. I've reset the unit whilst it was in stand by mode, nothing. It's not dirty inside, all very clean looking. Anyone know what's going on... Please help.

I've looked over the net all to no avail. 

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Explorer

@Losch wrote:
I tried to get an update... No Chance, the latest update is installed... And it works...

It is likely that Samsung have discovered the source of the problem and stopped it. Any machines switched on since they found it will not be affected. We will just have to wait and see if they come up with a solution to fix the now useless machines🤔🤔🤔

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Explorer

@Losch: I don't understant..you wrote that your HT-J4200 is NOT working.. and now it suddenly works?Does it mean that Samsung has fixed anything?

I also have 4200 and it is NOT working!

Apprentice

Some of the people on the US threads are getting thru and Samsung is sometimes fessing up to having a problem and asking for a few days to work on the solution.

 

 

Stole this from one of the US threads:

Models reported to have the BluRay Bootloop Bug so far:

BD-E5900 

BD-J5100 

BD-J5500 

BD-J5700 

BD-J5900 

BD-JM51 

BD-JM57C 

HT-J4200 

HT-J4500 

HT-J4530 

HT-J4550 

HT-J5500W 

HT-J5520WK 

HT-J5530 

 

Reported Locations so far:

Argentina
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
Chile
Colombia
Costa Rica
Czechia
Egypt
El Salvador
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Guatemala
Italy
Mexico
Netherlands
Nicaragua
South-Africa
Spain
Paraguay
Poland
Romania
Slovakia
Saint-Vincent
United Kingdom
Uruguay
USA

 

 

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Explorer
ht-J5550w
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Apprentice

For better understanding: i have 2 blue ray players... one J4500 does not works and one J4200 which works... Till now... 

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Apprentice

My response from Samsung UK Help this afternoon (not at all helpful):

 

 Samsung Help UK
 

 

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Observer

Got the same thing here in Holland with my ht-j5500. Started on thursday, tried everything, but nothing works. Bought another second hand ht-j5500, and that one worked for a little while untill I plugged in my ethernet cable. Couldn't find anything on the internet untill i saw this. A shame i plugged in my ethernet cable, f*cked it up myself haha

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First Poster

Hungary also :(

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Explorer

@RH90 wrote:

My response from Samsung UK Help this afternoon (not at all helpful):

 

 Samsung Help UK
 

 


That is odd. I got this response from UK help yesterday  'Thank you so much for staying online Gruff. Upon checking, the issue has been investigated by our Headquarters and they are now working on a resolution to fix the fault. Hence, we request for your patience in this regard'. Must depend on how clued up the helpline person is🤔🤔🤔

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Apprentice

Samsung TVs, Blu-ray vulnerable to eternal boot loop

Not your typical remote control.

By Darren Pauli Apr 20 2012  8:10AM

 

Samsung televisions and Blu-Ray players can be spun into continuous restart loops by deviants taking advantage of a remote control feature.

The devices could be made to restart every five seconds by setting fields such as MAC addresses to long strings.

This would trigger the crashing loop, which occurred too rapidly for hapless victims to intervene using their remote controllers.

This is not a simple temporary denial of service,” security researcher Luigi Auriemma wrote on a public disclosure. “The TV is just impossible to be used and reset.”

It was unclear if the attack, tested over a local network, was possible via the internet but Auriemma notes that more than 40 TCP ports were opened on the Samsung D6000 TV.

He told SC Magazine that realistic scenario would consist of an attacker accessing poorly protected WiFi networks where "from that moment you can reach the TV directly".

Users wishing to return to normal viewing would need to manually intervene with the failing units and activate a service function, a feat possible within the five second boot loop.

Attackers would need only hope that victims would accept a prompt to allow a newly detected remote device.

The vulnerable remote controller feature worked by default on enabled Samsung entertainment devices.

It allowed the units to be controlled by iPads and Android devices using the Samsung Remote application available on iTunes and Google's Play stores.

Auriemma tested the attack on a fully patched Samsung D6000 TV but he said other units supported by the Samsung app may be vulnerable.

He suspected a buffer-overflow vulnerability was present in the devices but he was not prepared to debug the devices and risk “killing [his] poor TV”.

The proof of concept code for the attack was available on his website.

It was not the first attack on internet-enabled TVs. Researchers from security firm Mocana published a report (pdf) claiming it was possible to push fake credit card forms to TVs, redirect internet traffic to phish users and steal manufacturer keys, and tap backend services.

Earlier this month, a simple denial of service attack was found in a Sony Bravia TV. Gabriel Menezes Nune, a security expert with the Brazilian Navy, attacked her own TV -- a Latin American model -- using the Hping tool. That crashed the unit, preventing access to all functions until it turned off.

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