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iPlayer HLG/UHD HDR on Samsung’s J and K Series TVs


@rozel wrote:

@tarbat wrote:

So, inconclusive I'm afraid.  It all depends on whether the BBC will broadcast the HLG World Cup in the same format as the current test loop.

And because they draw an analigy with the BBC Blue Planet transmissions, me thinks they won't, cos we couldn't see those :( .  But then what the he** is the point of the Test Loop?  I've emailed the BBC's R&D team, but not hopeful of a positive response here.


It's a simulation of a 'live streamed' event like a football game.

Voyager
So what do you mean exactly? Are you suggesting that we definately won't see the World Cup transmissions on the Roku?
Voyager

Just to mention one thing about the Roku Stick+. When playing HDR content from Netflix, my HDFury Integral correctly identifies the video as PQ (ST.2084), and has a different HDR infoframe than that coming from the iPlayer.

02:00:c2:33:c4:86:4c:1d:b8:0b:d0:84:80:3e:13:3d:42:40:e8:03:01:00:df:09:0f:03

 

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Voyager

I don't profess to understand a lot of the technical jargon but I came across this, which may explain the readouts on the Stats for Nerds in Youtube at least: -

 

Standards

SMPTE ST. 2084 - First official standardization of HDR video transfer function by a standardization body, and is at the moment (October 2016), the most widely implemented. SMPTE ST.2084 officially defines the PQ EOTF curve for translating a set of 10 bit, or 12 bit per channel digital values into a brightness range of 0.0001 to 10,000 nits. SMPTE ST.2084 provides the basis for HDR 10 Media Profile and Dolby Vision implementation standards.

This is the transfer function to select in HEVC encoding to signal a PQ HDR curve.

 

ARIB STD-B67 - Standardized implementation of Hybrid Log Gamma by the Association of Radio Industries and Businesses. Defines the use of the HLG curve, with 10 or 12 bits per channel color and the same color primaries as BT.2020 color space.

This is the transfer function to select in HEVC encoding to signal an HLG HDR curve.

 

ITU-T BT.2100 - ITU-T Recommendation BT.2100 - ITU-T’s standardization of HDR for television broadcast. Ratified in 2016, this document is the HDR equivalent of ITU-T Recommendation BT.2020 (Rec.2020 / BT.2020). When compared with BT.2020, BT.2100 includes the FHD (1920x1080) frame size in addition to the UHD and FUHD, and defines two acceptable transfer functions (PQ and HLG) for HDR broadcast, instead of the single transfer function (BT.1886 equivalent) found in BT.2020.

BT.2100 uses the same color primaries and the same RGB to YCbCr signal format transform as BT.2020, and includes similar permissions of 10 or 12 bits per channel as BT.2020, although BT.2100 also permits full range code values in 10 or 12 bits where BT.2020 is limited only to traditional legal.

BT.2100 also includes considerations for a chroma subsampling methodology based on the LMS color space (human visual system tristimulus values), called ICTCP, and a transform for ‘gamma weighting’ (in the sense of the PQ and HLG equivalent of gamma weighting) the LMS response as L’M’S’.

 

HDR 10 Media Profile - The Consumer Technologies Association (CTA)’s official HDR video standard for use in HDR Televisions. HDR 10 requires the use of the SMPTE ST.2084 EOTF, BT.2020 color space, 10 bits per channel, 4.2.0 chroma subsampling, and the inclusion of SMPTE ST.2086 and associated MaxCLL and MaxFALL metadata values.

HDR 10 Media Profile defines the signal televisions can decode for the inclusion of “HDR compatibility” term in the marketing of televisions.

Note that “HDR compatibility” does not necessarily define the ability to display in the higher dynamic range, simply to the compatibility to decode and renormalize footage in the HDR 10 specification for whatever the dynamic range and color space of the display happen to be.

 

Dolby Vision - Dolby’s proprietary implementation of the PQ curve, for theatrical setups and home devices. Dolby Vision supports both the BT.2020 and the DCI-P3 color space, at 10 and 12 bits per channel, for home and theater, respectively.

The distinguishing feature of Dolby Vision is the inclusion of shot-by-shot transform metadata that adapts the PQ graded footage into a limited range gamma 2.4 or gamma 2.6 output for SDR displays and projectors. The colorist grades the film in the target HDR space, and then runs a second adaptation pass to adapt the HDR grade into SDR, and the transform is saved into the rendered HDR output files as metadata. This allows for a level of backwards compatibility with HDR transmitted footage, while still being able to make the most of the SDR and the HDR ranges.

Because Dolby Vision is a proprietary format, it requires a license issued by Dolby and the use of qualified hardware, which at the moment (October 2016) is only the Dolby PRM-4220, the Sony BVM-X300, or the Canon DP-V2420 displays

 


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Voyager

Roku has now been added to the BBC list

 

cheers

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/help/live-uhd

John Archer's tweeted saying Roku have confirmed the SS+ doesn't support HLG, only HDR10.

Voyager

@TastyBurger666 wrote:

John Archer's tweeted saying Roku have confirmed the SS+ doesn't support HLG, only HDR10.


He seems to think it will be doing what i thought could be the case converting SDR to HDR10, this contradicts @tarbat findings though where his MU correctly identified the gamma as HLG

 

cheers

Explorer

Its good we have a short term option for 4k World cup at least I suppose

Navigator

I don’t object to a few common sense work around solutions to accessing HLG BBC iPlayer but this thread has offered none and completely lost focus on Samsung who appear to be getting let well of the hook. We should be focusing on standard letters to send to the Chief Executive  or supporting those willing to go to court with retailers for miselling. 


@JTE wrote:

I don’t object to a few common sense work around solutions to accessing HLG BBC iPlayer but this thread has offered none and completely lost focus on Samsung who appear to be getting let well of the hook. We should be focusing on standard letters to send to the Chief Executive  or supporting those willing to go to court with retailers for miselling. 


Why are they off the hook? I've made my particular circumstances very clear - I'm not getting a new TV until HDMI 2.1 is FULLY adopted, and my next TV wont be Samsung. My next Phone won't be Samsung, my next Smart Watch won't be Samsung, my next kettle won't be Samsung.

 

Catch my drift?

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